Irish Style Scone

I have this rather complex family heritage that includes: Irish, English, Australian, American Indian, Welsh, and U. S. A. Southern! My grandfather was a Georgia boy; and that honestly counts for heritage line itself! If he were alive today, he would insist that Southern came before all my other credits. If I had to choose a food item that represented my heritage I would choose the traditional British scone. My topping of choice for that lovely scone? Icy cold, thick, luxurious  double Devonshire cream! I could smother it on almost everything I eat….

I would participate in teatime at my grandmother Kathleen’s home. The formal living room and dining room were “off-limits’’ to children’s play. However this rule was null and void when it was “tea time.” A tray with the pink or yellow Chinese hand-painted teapot, Spode Queen’s Bird teacups, saucers and dessert plates set perfectly on her marble coffee table. I was allowed to sit wherever I chose, whether it was one of her Victorian chairs or the antique pale pink and gold raw silk covered setae.  This was teatime at Grandmother Kathleen’s home where the ceremony was rarely broken__ well, there were a few times usually when she had worked in the garden then tea time was held in the kitchen.

 Earl Gray or Orange Pekoe ** was steeped to perfection, you then had the choice of lemon, sugar or milk. However, if you chose Earl Grey, please do not add milk to this lovely, uplifting citrus perfumed black tea. Cookies, tea biscuits and upon special occasion scones were on the dessert platter! I always chose the scone. They had a light texture and a slight nuttiness from the flour; there was a good acidity from the baking powder; and, a rich, and tender feel in my mouth due to the butter, cream and double Devonshire cream piled a mile high!

A few years after her passing, I found her recipe card and there was the secret ingredient “OATMEAL” get out!! Are you kidding me? My proper British Grandmother, the red headed look a like version of Queen Elizabeth II was a scone-making rule breaking badass. I knew I loved her so!

Her 85th Birthday
Her 85th Birthday

Weeks before my bakery and café opened, I knew these scones would steal the show; and, oh boy did they ever. Newspaper articles were written about them; and, customers called into reserve them early in the morning! I did a cooking faux pas. I only made three-dozen a day and that was it, that’s all! My customers knew to get to my Café early in the morning; and, the scones would still be hot out of the oven with beautiful plump raisins at bursting point waiting for them.

photograph by Troy Overman
photograph by Troy Overman

Each batch makes six perfect triangles; however, I recommend doubling the recipe. The dough freezes well for up to a month. But I doubt you will ever keep these scones waiting in the freezer for that long. This is a huge leap of faith on my part to share this recipe with you. I am no longer in the world of retail; I’m not scared about my competition stealing my secret. Go ahead and make a batch, pour yourself a cuppa, load on the double Devonshire cream and just take a timeout to be quiet.

Cheers!

 

iphone4 photo
Grandmothers yellow Chinese teapot iphone4 photo

Kathleen’s Scones

Yields 6
Prep Time: 15 min
Cook Time: 30 min
Total Time: 45 min
 
Ingredients
  1. 1 ½ cups all purpose flour
  2. ½ c oat oatmeal
  3. 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  4. 1 tablespoon baking powder
  5. 4 ounces cubed cold salted butter
  6. ¾ cup heavy cream
  7. ¼ cup half and half
  8. ½ cup raisins
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees
  2. In a food processor grind the oatmeal for 1 minute then add the flour, sugar and baking powder. Pulse for 30 seconds, and then while the food processor is on slowly add your cold cubed butter. Process until the dough no longer spins around the bowl it will just stick to the sides. Remove dough from the food processor and place it in a large bowl, add raisins mix well and add the heavy cream. Mix until soft dough comes together but is not too sticky. Add half and half if needed. Then turn out onto your counter and softly knead until the dough comes together. Next, pat the dough out the shape of a circle until it is about 1” thick. Cut dough into 6 triangles; do not worry about being precise. Place scones on a parchment-lined pan and bake in the oven for 30 minutes until the tops are golden. Once done, remove from oven cool for 10 minutes. Serve and enjoy.
Notes
  1. I have used the zest of blood oranges and candied ginger, chocolate chips, blueberries, fresh raspberries, pumpkin pie spice, lemon zest and lemon zest with candies ginger. The additions are countless, I’ve even made these scones savory with the addition of fresh herbs, peppercorns and spices.

** Orange Peko tea does not taste of orange- it is referring to the black tea leaves grading; OP, BOP and FOP are the basic grading labels. OP- Orange Pekoe, BOP Broken Orange Pekoe and FOP Fancy Orange Pekoe.

6 Comments on Irish Style Scones

  1. Becky
    June 27, 2014 at 1:32 pm (3 years ago)

    Awesome! My husband LOOOVES scones! 🙂 Do you have a recipe for the topping?

    Reply
    • Kate Dunbar
      July 1, 2014 at 8:00 am (3 years ago)

      The only topping I have ever glazed these with is a powder sugar glaze. 1 cup sifted powder sugar, 2-4 tablespoons milk and some lemon zest.

      Reply
  2. Becky
    June 27, 2014 at 1:37 pm (3 years ago)

    OH also, what if you do not have a food processor? I have one but its mini.. Could the stand mixer work?

    Reply
    • Kate Dunbar
      July 1, 2014 at 8:01 am (3 years ago)

      yes, a stand mixer could work but the oats will not break down. Be sure to use your paddle attachment.

      Reply
  3. becky
    July 7, 2014 at 12:24 pm (3 years ago)

    Thanks! Your website looks awesome!

    Reply
    • Kate Dunbar
      July 7, 2014 at 5:25 pm (3 years ago)

      Thank you.

      Reply

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